Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Project: Palm Island Residence
Architects: Choeff Levy Fischman
Location: Miami Beach, Florida
Area: 13,676 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Choeff Levy Fischman

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Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman

Choeff Levy Fischman have designed this spectacular contemporary residence located in Miami Beach, Florida.
The Palm Island Residence offers 13,676 square foot of luxury to its inhabitants including a breathtaking swimming pool in the courtyard, flanked by an open pavilion. The home also features 9 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a powder room and a private rooftop terrace on top of it all. If this isn’t the perfect home, then what is? Take a look and let us know!

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

In true Tropical Modern style, Miami-based Choeff Levy Fischman respected the property’s natural elements by keeping the large tree and designing the master bedroom, pool, and outdoor kitchen around it to provide the owners with unobstructed waterfront views, as well as privacy.

The architects combined modern design with warm elements including natural stone, glass, wood, and water features to capture the essence of a Tropical Modern oasis. The main entrance features a granite driveway and a breathtaking carved limestone waterfall near the front door. Inside, Honed

Portuguese limestone flooring was used throughout the home, as well as texturized European smoked Oak wood details, and a two-story bronze fireplace. Outside, South American Ipe wood can be found in the driveway and on the exterior overhangs. The final product resulted in a 13,676 square foot, two-story home with 9 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, 1 powder room, and a private rooftop terrace.

Combined with vast sliding glass doors that pocket and disappear, the open-concept design blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor creating a seamless transition throughout the different areas of the home. Several reflecting ponds can be found throughout the home as well, providing zen-like areas for lounging and entertaining.

“With an emphasis on indoor-outdoor living, we incorporated reflecting ponds throughout the exterior of the home,” said Ralph Choeff. “When the sliders are open, it creates the illusion that the water elements are inside the home. This really blurred the lines of interior and exterior with this home.”

The wide-open yard boasts an oversized infinity edge pool that flows into shallow water and becomes a reflecting pond wrapping around an island with lounge-seating .The shallow water continues to the rear slider at the interior lounge to make it appear as if the water enters the interior of the residence once the sliders are fully open. The yard also features a large grass area, more than 100 feet of dock space, an outdoor kitchen and cabana with rooftop access – and of course, the Banyan tree.

Choeff Levy Fischman

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

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Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

Palm Island Residence by Choeff Levy Fischman in Miami Beach, Florida

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Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Project: Clock House Gardens
Architects: Stockwool
Location: Welwyn, Hertfordshire, England
Area: 46,080 sq ft
Photographs by: Morley von Sternberg

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Clock House Gardens by Stockwool

Stockwool have designed and completed a housing scheme as part of the Developing London scheme.
The £7 million scheme is located on the edge of the village of Welwyn in Hertfordshire, England and it spans across 46,080 square feet.
The Clock House Gardens project as it is called, transforms an old hotel site into a residential community that consists of 50 new homes contained within multiple two and three story buildings.

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens transforms a derelict hotel site into an intimate community of 50 new homes within five two and three-storey buildings that combine brickwork with timber cladding and together create a central shared courtyard.

The design solution responded to the site’s very particular context of the A1(M) motorway on one side and dense woodland on the other. The concept — a modern take on a walled village — was informed by the unique combination of urban and rural surroundings and sought to reduce noise and pollution from the motorway.

Deep reveals and projected windows create a richness in the elevations and this high-quality aesthetic makes the scheme a unique yet sensitive addition to the built fabric of Welwyn. Clock House Gardens is a totally flatted development, redressing a previous small home shortfall in Welwyn.

Key to its success is the careful layering of building form: the treatment responds to the harsher environment on the edge of the site with robust brickwork, where a softer treatment of timber and glazing is applied elsewhere to respond to the woodland beyond. All homes are dual-aspect to maximise on the great surrounding views.

An extensive landscaping strategy introduces planting and greenery back to the site with the neighbouring lush woodland brought into the development through the large central courtyard space.

Stockwool

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

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Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

Clock House Gardens by Stockwool in Hertfordshire, England

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Project: Black Lodge
Architects: Tomislav Soldo
Location: Gorski Kotar, Croatia
Area: 1,076 sq ft
Photographs by: Jure Živković

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo

Tomislav Soldo is a Croatian architect who has designed the Black Lodge in the mountainous region of Gorski Kotar in Croatia.
The modern two-story residence offers 1,076 square feet of living space as well as large windows that provide beautiful views of the spectacular surroundings.
The house doesn’t stand out much from the other homes in the region. It has a pitched roof, a compact layout and a facade made of wood, however, it is still unique in its own way. Check it out!

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

The genesis of this house might have a somewhat peculiar narrative. The possibly reversed but certainly not unwanted process of conceiving and designing the space where the foremost sensory role has the nature itself.

Initially, before everything else, there was a walnut tree, providing perfect natural shade and representing the first outdoor residing space. Over time, a terrace was gradually shaped around the tree, and eventually the idea of building the house emerged.

The sloped terrain with its panoramic view overlooking the nearby forest and mountainscape together with the position of the existing terrace were the only determining elements in the process of designing this country house.
Without any need for flirting with or referring to existing and traditional in its surrounding, with no need for appropriation or approval, this was simply about to be a house on a hill, a terrace extension and enclosed belvedere. The pitched roof, the compact layout design and the usage of wood in facade cladding were the only distinctive functional elements of the region accepted and implemented into the design.

With the gross floor area of 100m2 the house consists of a small storage on basement level, a living room with an open kitchen and a bathroom unit on the ground floor, and a sleeping area on mezzanine level.

The intention to obtain a spatial flow between the exterior and interior, notably in terms of connecting the indoor kitchen area, the summer outdoor kitchen and the terrace, was equally sought to be achieved in the interior design itself in the form of an open space plan.

Accordingly, the entire house is perceived as a single volume, greatly reflecting the surrounding nature from its every single point, whereas the kitchen and the bathroom area form a small compact box-like core set within the larger house volume.

Apart from the concrete basement and foundations, the house was entirely made of aerated concrete blocks which significantly accelerated construction at the given location. The 30cm thick exterior walls, also made of aerated concrete blocks, met all building physics requirements with no additional thermal insulation needed. The thermal efficiency in terms of unwanted overheating during summer and heat loss in winter time was enhanced by a ventilated facade made of Siberian larch cladding.

The facade is painted with two layers of black wood tar, a natural genuine product which penetrates deep into the wood giving it protection and lasting for a long period of time.

The appearance of daytime black compact and seemingly monolithic structure is altered in the evening by switching the lights on. The house becomes a delicate almost lantern like object, casting light on its surroundings through the shutter slots imitating the sun rays that illuminate the interior during the day.

Tomislav Soldo

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

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JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

Project: JJ&S.M House
Architects: Atelier Mima
Location: Nivillac, France
Area: 968 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Atelier Mima

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JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima

The JJ&S.M House is a secluded modern dwelling designed by the Nantes-based studio Atelier Mima
They have managed to design this home in a way that it blends into the sloping terrain of Nivillac, France. It’s low profile is mostly responsible for that.

Clad with vertically-aligned timber panels, the facade camouflages the house among the forest with its repeated pattern that seems to echo the pattern of the surrounding trees.
Even though the interior areas are able to harvest as much sunlight as possible, the windows have been carefully positioned in order to ensure privacy. Take a peek!

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

A house in the landscape of the Vilaine valley to rest of city life: Given the quality of this environment, we choose to use simplicity. From the outside, it is a straightforward and unobtrusive relationship with the landscape, a mass of wood blending with the surrounding tones. From the inside, it’s a preciousness assemblies, plans, framing and noble materials decomposing the space to create a prism compared to the multiple and surprising environment.

The house alights at break of slope, in articulation of the landscape, as inhabited gazebo. The plan offers various design possibilities around an intimate upper level and a bottom living space linked to a large balcony terrace.

Two bedrooms, dedicated to two couples, are linked to a central bathroom with wide doors with brick partition. This can be likened to one or other of the chambers when the two pairs are not present simultaneously. The floor of the upper level extends to the kitchen worktop. A third door with brick partition is placed here to help in day to open the perspective on the entire depth of the house, featuring the series of spaces.

A bookcase / stairs / kitchen articulates the two levels, and allows optimizing the feeling of space by integrating these functions in a single place. A long thin room expands to West pinion, deconstructed in its angles to watch, the Vilaine that wraps around the field: south through a long bay of 10 m, and north through a panoramic piercing sitting on a wooden bench and concrete, both storage and wood stove support.

Atelier Mima

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

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JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

JJ&S.M House by Atelier Mima in Nivillac, France

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Project: Palatine Passive House
Architects: Malboeuf Bowie Architecture
Location: Greenwood, Seattle, Washington, USA
Area: 2,700 sq ft
Photographs by: Shea Pollard

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture have created a masterpiece of a house in the form of the Palatine Passive House which is located in Greenwood, Seattle.
This home uses 90% less energy than what the standard building code requires. Simultaneously, it provides its residents with a modern and incredibly comfortable living space.
It’s amazingly low energetic footprint is achieved by optimizing the lighting, cooling, heating and ventilation using a smart monitoring system that is controlled by a mobile app. But that’s not where the uniqueness of this home ends.
On the outside, it’s got a distinct herringbone facade to greet you. It is more than just a unique facade as it requires absolutely no maintenance.
The interior of the home is inspired by the Scandinavian design. Take a look!

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Conceived as a sustainable reinterpretation of a monolithic gable roof house, the Palatine Passive House integrates modern residential form with innovative building technologies. The certified passive house was designed and built by the architect. Apart from an abundantly glazed entrance gesture, the distinctive façade is windowless in order to meet passive house certification standards.

The unique façade is composed of hand-charred cedar in a herringbone pattern, adding a twist to a classic Northwest American building material. The dark patina complements the lush, tree-lined neighborhood streets, while the shou sugi ban treatment naturally seals the cedar, eliminating the need for regular maintenance in a rainy Seattle climate. Once inside, the large windows and white, minimal interior maximize natural daylight to create a light filled space that is private from the street.

The first level is a large open volume that spills out to the back yard for the social functions of the residential program. High ceilings on the second floor allow for a mix of private and loft spaces. An open double height circulation area joins the two levels and connects the public and private functions of the house.

In pursuing PHIUS certification, innovative building technologies and construction methods emerged in the envelope assembly, cladding fabrication, and energy management systems. Due to an airtight envelope, continuous high-performance insulation, and managed solar gain, the Palatine Passive House uses 90% less energy than required by local building code. The house employs a continuously filtered heat and moisture recovery ventilation system, resulting in excellent air quality and temperature control for a healthy, comfortable living environment. Kirio, a home management & control system, monitors all major energy components, optimizes efficiency, and allows residents to manage lighting, cooling, heating, and ventilation from a phone app. In a testament to the progressive design, engineers used the Palatine Passive House as testing ground for the system.

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

 

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

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House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

Project: House by the Lake
Architects: ACDF Architecture
Location: Magog, Canada
Area: 3,875 sq ft
Photographs by: Adrien Williams

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House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture

ACDF Architecturea Canadian studio, have designed the House by the Lake close to the shores of Lake Memphremagog in Magog, Canada. The goal of this home’s design is to satisfy the need of the owners for a second home that will demonstrate their desire to return to a steady lifestyle. It uses simple technologies while the materials that it is made of require very little maintenance.

The key focus of the design of the House by the Lake is openness. It is surrounded by a beautiful landscape and the architects wanted to provide the residents of this home with striking and unobstructed views of the immediate surroundings.

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

Located on the shores of Lake Memphremagog in the Eastern Townships, the House on the Lake is a secondary residence designed for two clients in the prime of life who are native to the region, and alternate between Montreal and Magog. During the design, the two clients who love the land, nature and music, quickly expressed the desire for a home with an open living area. The starting point for the architecture is the immediate landscape and the scenic beauty of the surroundings. Large scale agricultural lands and valleys, whose only visual limits are wooden fences and stone walls, extend to the horizon and open again to other mountainous landscapes. The house naturally absorbs this idea of the local panoramic landscape, except that the limits of a fence are used here to define the space, creating a place for the program by trapping the substance of landscape in its center. The vernacular typology of the Eastern Townships, with the wooden farm buildings and sustainable structures made of field stone, is reinterpreted to define the contemporary house now opened generously to the landscape

ACDF Architecture

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

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House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

House by the Lake by ACDF Architecture in Magog, Canada

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Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Project: Afeka House
Architects: Bar Orian Architects
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Area: 4,650 sq ft
Photographs by: Amit Geron

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Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects

The Afeka House is a contemporary private house designed by the Israeli firm Bar Orian ArchitectsIt is located in Tel Aviv, Israel.
The design of this two story residence takes into account the climatic needs of each interior space. For this reason, each window is set for a certain interior function, acting as a frame for the shading system that accommodates the climate control in the house. It also allows a selectable degree of light filtering allowing the inhabitants to choose the amount of sunlight that the shades let in.

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Functionality and simplicity of materials were the starting points for planning this villa in a northern neighborhood of Tel Aviv. The house was planned as a basic geometric structure– a combination of two raw-concrete boxes on top of each other. Each box has seemingly random openings, and an external shading system that rotates and opens electronically, so that the dynamic façade change with residents’ needs, the time of day, and the weather.

The interior design brings in the same principles of simplicity and climatic efficiency, with the architecture now moving indoors. The interior planning is based on clear and simple movement around two raw concrete supporting walls, which echo the exterior. The staircase to the basement and first floor is located between these two walls. All household functioned emanate freely from this focal point. A spacious kitchen with oak cabinets and a stainless-steel cooking island, with an adjacent living room and dining room are on one side. The other side holds a library with a black-hardware workspace, and a parents’ suite facing the front garden. Up on the first floor are a service room and three children’s rooms, each with its own bathroom and roof terrace created by moving the upper box. A bright, functional hallway is placed between the two wings, hosting the parallel staircase.

The dominant design element in the house – as it is on its facades – is the exterior aluminum, Corten-finished shading system. Each window is set for an interior function, and acts as an interior frame from the shading system that has been positioned to accommodate sunlight and the climactic needs of each interior space. This system allows various degrees of light filtering, creating an additional layer that enriches the space and brings the tangible outdoors experience into the house. This layer changes continuously with the direction of the sun, the amount of opening of the shading system. At time, the rooms are flooded with shades of red, creating unique compositions inside and varying exposure outside. The interior, like the exterior, is not static. This house has life and movement every hour of the day.

Bar Orian Architects

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

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Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

Afeka House by Bar Orian Architects in Tel Aviv, Israel

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T-House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

Project: T-House
Architects: EKAR Architects
Location: Nonthaburi, Thailand
Area: 5,381 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of EKAR Architects

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T-House by EKAR Architects

The T-House combines an office, a garment warehouse and a family residence in two buildings on a same plot.
It was designed by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand and it is a blend of Thai living habitat and western ideals. It is a mixture of tropical architecture with modernity, resulting in a simple form.
The heart of the house is located perfectly in the center of the main structure. It is composed of two staircases that cross each other, connecting all of the rooms.

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

An office, a warehouse, plus a residence for family expansion.
According to an initial requirement of the project owner, Khun Noppawarat Pornputhakul, the main functions of T-House were created to support her family business, a cloth wholesaller from Pratunam District. To maintain the circulations and routine of the old house in Nonthaburi Province, a new built needed to be not just only a residence for an expanding family plus a small garment storage, but also needed to include an additional space for a new office and prepare an area for a further phase of family extension.

‘Jai Baan or a heart of the house’ locating perfectly at the heart of this two-storey dwell. This centered piece is composed of two crossing staircases functioning to connect all rooms on the second level. One performed itself laying on a T-shaped layout. It ties the working spaces between two floors together; the main working area on the ground floor and the executive office on the second floor. Meanwhile, another staircase is working to connect the private spaces; living area, bedrooms, kitchen of the first floor, and two bedrooms on the second floor.

By stacking two T-shaped staircases, the designers intended to create the crossed circulation between two zones, the public zone and the private zone. As a result, an executive room on the second floor is able to view the activities of the habitant happened on the ground floor through the double-volume space. Two bedrooms on the second floor were also placed facing each other on the opposite sides. Both are connecting together with the bridge, thus the owner is able to see the working area down below at all time. Living space on ground floor was planned despite the criteria of owner’s mother who would like to have a traditional Thai living room, one that consisted ‘Tang or big wooden sofa bed.’ The designer, therefore, transformed the form of the olden Tang using the western-styled sofa to form a new different shape with multi-functions of sofa bed. The transformation of cotton is also brought to apply with the ceiling pattern to make the house more unique.

EKAR Architects

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

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T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

T House by EKAR Architects in Nonthaburi, Thailand

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Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Project: Baitasi House of the Future
Architects: dot Architects
Location: Beijing, China
Area: 322 sq ft
Photographs by: Wu Qingshan

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Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects

The Baitasi House of the Future is a modular home created by dot Architects in Beijing, China. This home was designed for the tech company Whaley who focus on smart homes. They’ve commissioned the Chinese studio to develop a compact modern home that can be suited to the changing lifestyles of its residents.
The most impressive features of this house is the movable furniture modules as well as fixed modules that accommodate foldable beds. This design enables the interior to be reconfigured according to the inhabitants’ wishes.

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future is located in a historic hutong area of Beijing. The client is a tech company focuses on the smart homes. The commission is to create an experimental house that suits the future lifestyles of young people.

Baitasi is one of the well preserved hutong neighborhoods. The original site had a 30 sqm house and a 80 sqm yard cramped with illegal building works.
When we talk about house we are talking about home. The house of the future should represent such a lifestyle of young people.

They can fluidly shift between work and home. Access and convenience are more important to them than ownership. The possibilities of home space outweigh its physical dimension. The boundary between home and society is blurred by the rise of the sharing economy, nomad workers and technology. Our lives are fragmented and can not be accommodated by a fixed layout.

The original house is wood framed. To minimise construction work and reveal the beauty of traditional Chinese wooden structure, we replaced the decayed roof and removed all the interior partitions. Two moveable furniture modules and one fixed module are placed under the new roof. With the moveable modules, the house can have four different layout options.

According to the needs of the residents, it can shift from a three bedrooms house to a small office. The facade can be open up to connect the living space and the outdoors.

The moveable modules are controlled by a smart TV. This TV system also controls lighting modes, curtains, security alarm and other home appliances.

Based on the strategy of minimal intervention, we use WikiHouse system for the only new built structure on site. It serves as the kitchen and toilet. The WikiHouse is an open-source project for building houses. It is lightweight and digitally fabricated. Its faster and cleaner construction process suits the crowded and noise sensitive neighbourhood very well.

Compared to many futuristic design, this tiny house is nothing close to future at the first look. But its humble appearance and user adaptive interior may reflect something about the future in the ancient capital.

dot Architects

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

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Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

Baitasi House of the Future by dot Architects in Beijing, China

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Keeping Yourself Safe From Theft This Winter

Winter is a time for giving, but unfortunately, some people in the world also take it as a time for taking. As the holidays begin to reach their peak, theft of all sorts will also be on the rise. Learning and implementing more ways to keep yourself safe in winter is the best thing you can do to cut down on your chances of being a target.

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Keeping Yourself Safe From Theft This Winter

Keep The Lights On

One way that burglars will know which house to target is by scoping out a location multiple times to see if the lights go on at night. If they don’t, it’s a definite sign that the occupants are away. To avoid this telltale giveaway that you aren’t around to protect your things, try out a light timer. This will automatically turn your lights on and off at the same time every day, whether it’s your outdoor lights or Christmas lights within the house. There are even apps and devices you can get to manually control your lights from your smartphone no matter where you are, creating the illusion of an occupied house.

Check Your Locks

Your locks are the biggest line of defense between you and anyone who’s looking to clean your home out. Make sure that you’re taking good care of them. You should do a perimeter check of your locks every now and then, making sure that they’re all tightly fit and that none of them have been damaged by age. Keep stock of whether or not there seem to be any signs of tampering as well, which can be a big tip off that your house has been scoped out.

Protect Your Car

Your home isn’t going to be the only thing thieves are scoping out this season. Theft from cars also rises as home burglaries do, and oftentimes, a car might be broken into in lieu of a home because it’s seen as an easier target. You can protect your car by ensuring that you have a working alarm if it’s broken into. Additionally, never keep any valuables in plain sight! This includes paperwork, packages, shopping bags, electronics, or even just the charge cables. That’s a surefire sign that you might have some valuables in your car, and it will encourage thieves to rifle through your glovebox.

Avoid Package Theft

One of the biggest concerns this holiday season is package theft. Burglars will often scope out homes to see if any unprotected packages have been left out on the porch, since stealing them is just a matter of walking to the door and scooping the box up. These days, installing a porch camera or a doorbell camera is one of the best ways to discourage thieves. They’re less likely to target you if there’s an obvious camera right by the door. Motion-detection cameras can also alert you anytime someone is moving in front of your door. There are even some camera doorbells that allow you to speak through a speaker system, which can scare potential thieves away.

Don’t Overshare

Stop posting your whereabouts and shopping spoils on social media! Social media platforms are a great place for robbers to scope out their potential targets. Through this, they have an idea of what to look for in a home and when the house itself will be left unguarded. As much as you might want to talk about the diamond necklace you just got or your upcoming week-long vacation, it’s best not to, since you could be giving a burglar an in.

Secure Your Windows

Some windows come with locks, but many don’t. If you want an extra layer of security, installing window locks can be a great way to do that. If you have sliding windows, it’s also possible to go for a low-budget solution instead and cut a wooden pole to fit the gap at the bottom of the window. When you place the pole into the gap at the base of the window, it will make it impossible for a burglar to pry the window open.

Get Flood or Motion Lights

Whether or not it’s better to leave your lights on or off during the night is a hotly debated issue. However, it’s generally agreed that motion lights are a great way to deter would-be burglars. It keeps your home relatively dark, unless something moves in front of the motion detection system. In many cases, this will trigger floodlights, which are bright and can cover an entire yard. Some floodlights are even bright enough to wake the occupants of a home, which is why many potential burglars will leave once they have been triggered.

Keeping Yourself Safe From Theft This Winter

Install A Security System

If you haven’t already done so, a tried-and-true way to secure your house is by installing a security system. Many systems will have strong and obvious alarms, and some will open a direct line with the police if a break-in has been detected. Some systems even offer 24/7 monitoring so that there’s a real person ensuring things aren’t getting sticky at all hours of the day. Capturing any intruder on video is also a huge asset if they escape since it can help police find them and get them off the streets.

Keep Things Hidden

It’s a tradition for many to keep their tree by the window, and to put gifts under it all throughout the month. However, this is essentially like putting valuables on display. It can make your home very attractive to thieves, especially if you have boxes under the tree that very obviously show what’s inside. Particularly attention-drawing are the electronic boxes, though any larger package, in general, can attract unwanted attention. This holiday season, try waiting to put your packages under the tree until it’s almost time to open them. Otherwise, consider moving your tree to another location to cut down on wandering, unwanted eyes.

Dealing with theft in the winter holiday is an extra stress that no one needs. Give these tips and tricks a try if you want to cut down on your chances of becoming a potential target.

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